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Freshwater Enviroments

Page history last edited by PBworks 12 years, 10 months ago

 Freshwater enviroments range from lakes, streams, bogs and rivers, and they all support a veriaty of wildlife.

 

 

 

LAKES and PONDS

 

-Definition, Lake.

A lake is a body of water or other liquid of considerable size contained on a body of land. The vast majority of lakes on Earth are fresh water, and most lie in the northern hemisphere at higher latitudes. In ecology, the environment of a lake is referred to as lacustrine. Smaller lakes tend to put the word "lake" after the name, as in Green Lake, while larger lakes often invert the word order, as in Lake Ontario, at least in North America. In some places, the word "lake" does not correctly appear in the name at all.

Over 60% of the world's lakes are in Canada.

 

-life in lakes and ponds.

Much of the life found in lakes and pondsare near the shore, where there are more nutrients on the water, and where sunlight can reach, causing photosynthesys in plants. Insects, plants with roots, and small fish thrive in this area. In the sunlight away from the shore, there are small, free-floating organisms called plankton. Lakes and ponds are also home to a variety of amphibians such as frogs, and salamanders, and larger fish in the deeper parts.

 

 BOGS

 

-Definition, Bog.

A bog is a body of water that accumulates a deposit of dead plant material. They are extremely acidic, and lichin is the main plant found in bogs. Bogs are very common in cold, temperate climates, mostly in the northern hemisphere. The worlds largest bogs are in the Western Siberian Lowlands in Russia, which cover more than 600,000 square kilometers.

 

 

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